21 Comments

  1. Pat Shamblin said:

    DC, your blog is super informative, you got me thinking more about planning peak performance for a scheduled race, sleeping and eating. Do you have any special tricks for getting to sleep when you don’t feel sleepy?

    Also, what is your feeling about coffee and caffeine? I don’t normally do it, but I drank coffee before my mountain run yesterday and I seem to have an overall better performance and felt better.

    September 5, 2011
    • Hey P-dawg,

      Mountain run!? Where’d you go? Sounds awesome.

      Yeah. Sleeping. Normally not an issue at all for me. I mentioned it here regarding about a 1 month window in June. Man… some nights I just could not sleep. Other nights… I could not stay awake past 8pm. I think it is more of a chronic, hormonal deal. Tricks? Routine, routine, routine. I also try not to eat after a certain time… like 8pm or so. As for coffee and caffeine.. man… I love coffee.. regular.. black coffee… straight americanos. I love coffee! I think as long as it is not a crutch… or a substance used to boost daily energy and ‘make up’ for fatigue… I think it is fine. With small quantities… there is a tremendous performance boost. The less you drink day-to-day… the more boost you get when you do drink it. Keep on it.

      September 5, 2011
  2. Pat Shamblin said:

    DC, your blog is super informative, you got me thinking more about planning peak performance for a scheduled race, sleeping and eating. Do you have any special tricks for getting to sleep when you don’t feel sleepy?

    Also, what is your feeling about coffee and caffeine? I don’t normally do it, but I drank coffee before my mountain run yesterday and I seem to have an overall better performance and felt better.

    September 5, 2011
  3. said:

    Very cool to see an honest self assessment of a season, where it went, and thoughts about how you can correct it. I find it encouraging that top athletes often deal with the same issues, challenges in balancing training, how hard to push, when to let go – as the lot of us.

    Enjoy these days with Jordan … they pass quickly.

    All the best

    September 6, 2011
  4. said:

    Very cool to see an honest self assessment of a season, where it went, and thoughts about how you can correct it. I find it encouraging that top athletes often deal with the same issues, challenges in balancing training, how hard to push, when to let go – as the lot of us.

    Enjoy these days with Jordan … they pass quickly.

    All the best

    September 6, 2011
  5. said:

    Very cool to see an honest self assessment of a season, where it went, and thoughts about how you can correct it. I find it encouraging that top athletes often deal with the same issues, challenges in balancing training, how hard to push, when to let go – as the lot of us.

    Enjoy these days with Jordan … they pass quickly.

    All the best

    September 6, 2011
  6. said:

    GZ is right on the money as usual on all accounts. Us “regular folk” do find ti encouraging that we all go through similar struggles albeit at different levels.
    Good luck with parenthood. It is a wonderful time and it does pass so quickly. If your’e finding that “serial racing” is not the best for your body, then that leaves more daddy-daughter time which is SO special!
    Good luck Duncan.
    Cheers!

    September 7, 2011
  7. said:

    GZ is right on the money as usual on all accounts. Us “regular folk” do find ti encouraging that we all go through similar struggles albeit at different levels.
    Good luck with parenthood. It is a wonderful time and it does pass so quickly. If your’e finding that “serial racing” is not the best for your body, then that leaves more daddy-daughter time which is SO special!
    Good luck Duncan.
    Cheers!

    September 7, 2011
  8. Steve Pero said:

    Congratulations to you and Annie on the birth of your daughter, my daughter is now 30 and it’s been quite a ride, enjoy every minute of it.

    Rest up and 2012 will be your comeback year.

    September 7, 2011
  9. Steve Pero said:

    Congratulations to you and Annie on the birth of your daughter, my daughter is now 30 and it’s been quite a ride, enjoy every minute of it.

    Rest up and 2012 will be your comeback year.

    September 7, 2011
  10. Steve Pero said:

    Congratulations to you and Annie on the birth of your daughter, my daughter is now 30 and it’s been quite a ride, enjoy every minute of it.

    Rest up and 2012 will be your comeback year.

    September 7, 2011
  11. said:

    Duncan,

    There are lessons in your recap for all of us. And at 42 years old I can tell you missteps still happen. The older I get though the less uptight I get over them.
    Insomnia can be a sign of stepping over the line in training. I have used hops and valerian root drops in some water with great results. All natural and non habit forming.
    Congrats to you and Annie on the birth of your little angel. Best wishes to you all.

    Cheers!

    September 7, 2011
  12. said:

    Duncan,

    There are lessons in your recap for all of us. And at 42 years old I can tell you missteps still happen. The older I get though the less uptight I get over them.
    Insomnia can be a sign of stepping over the line in training. I have used hops and valerian root drops in some water with great results. All natural and non habit forming.
    Congrats to you and Annie on the birth of your little angel. Best wishes to you all.

    Cheers!

    September 7, 2011
  13. said:

    Duncan,

    There are lessons in your recap for all of us. And at 42 years old I can tell you missteps still happen. The older I get though the less uptight I get over them.
    Insomnia can be a sign of stepping over the line in training. I have used hops and valerian root drops in some water with great results. All natural and non habit forming.
    Congrats to you and Annie on the birth of your little angel. Best wishes to you all.

    Cheers!

    September 7, 2011
  14. Jason Johnson said:

    Duncan,

    Congratulations to you and Annie on the birth of your little girl! My daughter, Emily, is 3 years old and, while being her Dad comes as it’s own challenge, the days pass so fast! Enjoy every single one of them!

    Thank you for the post and it’s frankness. It’s in the moments of introspection when real growth happens!

    I hope you are thinking about Red Hot in Moab in February! If so, I’ll see you and, hopefully, Annie and Jordan there.

    My best to you and your family on this new “ultra” you have undertaken!

    Jason

    September 7, 2011
  15. Jason Johnson said:

    Duncan,

    Congratulations to you and Annie on the birth of your little girl! My daughter, Emily, is 3 years old and, while being her Dad comes as it’s own challenge, the days pass so fast! Enjoy every single one of them!

    Thank you for the post and it’s frankness. It’s in the moments of introspection when real growth happens!

    I hope you are thinking about Red Hot in Moab in February! If so, I’ll see you and, hopefully, Annie and Jordan there.

    My best to you and your family on this new “ultra” you have undertaken!

    Jason

    September 7, 2011
  16. Jason Johnson said:

    Duncan,

    Congratulations to you and Annie on the birth of your little girl! My daughter, Emily, is 3 years old and, while being her Dad comes as it’s own challenge, the days pass so fast! Enjoy every single one of them!

    Thank you for the post and it’s frankness. It’s in the moments of introspection when real growth happens!

    I hope you are thinking about Red Hot in Moab in February! If so, I’ll see you and, hopefully, Annie and Jordan there.

    My best to you and your family on this new “ultra” you have undertaken!

    Jason

    September 7, 2011
  17. Duncan: Congrats on your daughter. That is wonderful news!

    In 2008, my son was born. He was born on May 9 and I had a 100-miler 5 weeks later and a road marathon inbetween. Despite a horrdenous lack of sleep for those 5 weeks after my son was born (we didn’t know it yet at the time, but he had severe reflux and a milk protein allergy and was in very bad pain, so sleeping was difficult for him), I got through the marathon just fine with a 2:58, and then in the 100 I was on fire for the first 60 miles. I was on pace for a ~16-hour race and was in the lead. And then my knee blew up on me and I hobbled into the finish 4th overall, also fighting horrendous GI distress. I was devestated to have lost the lead and it took me a little bit of time to get healthy again. My theory, looking back on that chapter, was that sleep deprivation, along with an aggressive racing and training schedule (was doing about 100-110 mpw), had simply resulted in a failure to properly recovery. Hence the blown up knee mid-race. Another huge factor was the stress of having a pregnant wife and just worrying about a healthy mom and baby.

    The next year I came back and won that same 100. My son’s problems with reflux and milk cleared up and things got a bit easier. Today, it’s hard getting in the mileage with a working wife and little guy and full-time job, but somehow I manage to do it.

    Don’t be too hard on yourself. As you will agree, a child is a blessing unlike any other. The ability to run is another great blessing. The ability to run at the level that you run is yet another wonderful blessing (an ability that far exceeds my own limited ability).

    Glad to hear your energy is coming back!

    Wyatt

    September 8, 2011
  18. Duncan: Congrats on your daughter. That is wonderful news!

    In 2008, my son was born. He was born on May 9 and I had a 100-miler 5 weeks later and a road marathon inbetween. Despite a horrdenous lack of sleep for those 5 weeks after my son was born (we didn’t know it yet at the time, but he had severe reflux and a milk protein allergy and was in very bad pain, so sleeping was difficult for him), I got through the marathon just fine with a 2:58, and then in the 100 I was on fire for the first 60 miles. I was on pace for a ~16-hour race and was in the lead. And then my knee blew up on me and I hobbled into the finish 4th overall, also fighting horrendous GI distress. I was devestated to have lost the lead and it took me a little bit of time to get healthy again. My theory, looking back on that chapter, was that sleep deprivation, along with an aggressive racing and training schedule (was doing about 100-110 mpw), had simply resulted in a failure to properly recovery. Hence the blown up knee mid-race. Another huge factor was the stress of having a pregnant wife and just worrying about a healthy mom and baby.

    The next year I came back and won that same 100. My son’s problems with reflux and milk cleared up and things got a bit easier. Today, it’s hard getting in the mileage with a working wife and little guy and full-time job, but somehow I manage to do it.

    Don’t be too hard on yourself. As you will agree, a child is a blessing unlike any other. The ability to run is another great blessing. The ability to run at the level that you run is yet another wonderful blessing (an ability that far exceeds my own limited ability).

    Glad to hear your energy is coming back!

    Wyatt

    September 8, 2011
  19. Duncan: Congrats on your daughter. That is wonderful news!

    In 2008, my son was born. He was born on May 9 and I had a 100-miler 5 weeks later and a road marathon inbetween. Despite a horrdenous lack of sleep for those 5 weeks after my son was born (we didn’t know it yet at the time, but he had severe reflux and a milk protein allergy and was in very bad pain, so sleeping was difficult for him), I got through the marathon just fine with a 2:58, and then in the 100 I was on fire for the first 60 miles. I was on pace for a ~16-hour race and was in the lead. And then my knee blew up on me and I hobbled into the finish 4th overall, also fighting horrendous GI distress. I was devestated to have lost the lead and it took me a little bit of time to get healthy again. My theory, looking back on that chapter, was that sleep deprivation, along with an aggressive racing and training schedule (was doing about 100-110 mpw), had simply resulted in a failure to properly recovery. Hence the blown up knee mid-race. Another huge factor was the stress of having a pregnant wife and just worrying about a healthy mom and baby.

    The next year I came back and won that same 100. My son’s problems with reflux and milk cleared up and things got a bit easier. Today, it’s hard getting in the mileage with a working wife and little guy and full-time job, but somehow I manage to do it.

    Don’t be too hard on yourself. As you will agree, a child is a blessing unlike any other. The ability to run is another great blessing. The ability to run at the level that you run is yet another wonderful blessing (an ability that far exceeds my own limited ability).

    Glad to hear your energy is coming back!

    Wyatt

    September 8, 2011

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