44 Comments

  1. John Clement said:

    What makes anyone think that hunter gatherers did not eat any naturally occurring grains? They are everywhere. And with little or no actuall knowledge of their true lifestyle or longevity/health, why assume they are good role models for todays athlete?

    September 28, 2011
    • Good point. My major thought on the evolutionary biology science behind this ‘paleo movement’ is this: If we believe in the textbook model of evolution, and there were 3 million people on the earth tens of thousands of years ago, and today there are approximately 7 billion people… then, are we not evolving as a species? If we are evolving as a species, then why would we want to go back to the ‘hunter-gather days’? The physiological science of paleo makes sense to me, but not the evolutionary science. Call me unsophisticated, but that is what I think. One major thought or theory is that the genetic modification of grains over the past 100 years has greatly influenced our body’s ability to properly digest them anymore. Not sure about that either, but it seems to make sense.

      September 28, 2011
  2. John Clement said:

    Fair enough. I grew up surrounded by hundreds of square miles of wheat fields. Life without grain? That’s no life at all:) Seriously, I will be really interested to hear how this works in the Callahan digestive and performance lab when you are doing some long miles. Interesting topic.

    September 28, 2011
  3. said:

    Duncan- this year through my training cycles I have been doing a modified paleo diet and specifically time my carbs to when I am running (i.e. either right before/after). I was eating minimal grains (in fact nothing other than my morning oats) and using sweet potatoes/potatoes/corn tortillas as my only carb source. I also cut out sugar including fruit sugar. I found that this really worked for me despite carrying a heaving load. I am not anti-grain (though I am gluten intolerant). I have just found that the minimal carb approach/specific carb approach has really helped support my training, racing and recovering this year.

    September 28, 2011
    • Right on Devon. Thanks for the input. I am not completely intolerant of any grain (or so I think) but have found my daily energy levels even out so far too. My digestion right now actually feels worse. (I used to be a huge fruit eater, and thus always cleaned out). I am leaner and generally feel better. I imagine I will be picking your brain a bit about nutrient timing for carbs post workout. Peter D has been a big help too. I likely will also be turning to Joe Friel’s book: ‘Paleo Diet for Athletes’ for guidance as I begin training again. BTW… nice race at UROC. Fun to follow. Recover well. All the best.

      September 28, 2011
  4. said:

    In the ultra-endurance world, I don’t believe there’s a place for fad diets, diets, or fads. I think some of the business management principles from, Elyahu Goldratt may apply a to the sport. e.g. “Viable Vision” what is viable? and TOC (The theory of constraints) What are the bottle necks (constraints) that athlete face?

    How does what we eat support or hamper these?

    1. Moods/emotions/thoughts (Trying to remain positive.)
    2. Endocrine system (Support here is critical.)
    3. Stomach (What can the athlete keep down?)

    The biggest challenge I ever faced was when, ultimately my endocrine system failed me. It was triggered by a monster amount of training. The symptoms were, moodiness, unstable appetite, and fatigue. My thyroid, adrenals, and maybe more glands, couldn’t keep up with the demand put on them. This would be my “bottle neck” or constraint.

    Could I have avoided this if I ate different foods? Or, if I had slept more? If so, I could have become even stronger and ultimately had the race performance of my life? Right before this “crash” and “going off the cliff” experience, you could say that my performance was peaked. Now, “Viable Vision” comes in. Did I peak out at the highest performance possible, before this crash? Or, could I have done something to go even farther and become stronger yet? What is my “viable vision”? What is possible?

    I think of a triangle: Eat, Sleep, Train. (and of course there are numerous variation of all these.) A change of one, effects the others in ways that we may not understand thoroughly. One of my life time greatest challenges is how to sleep, don’t misunderstand, I sleep fine, BUT, the higher my fitness level, the more I’m stimulated, the less I want to sleep and the more I want to train. – All the while I probably need MORE sleep as I train more but, I sleep less. (I can’t go beyond 4 to 6 hours when I train that hard but could probably use, 8 to 12!) This is a tough dilemma. I think the question of optimum diet is similarly difficult.

    What foods does your endocrine system need? I think this becomes complicated when we have to go beyond nutrition for fuel, repair, and maintenance and embrace considerations such as glycemic index and whatever else.

    When arriving at the table to fuel up, what do you choose? After hating cantaloupe, all my life, I picked up cantaloupe and gobbled it down at every single aid station, (as well as peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.) I went 100% off instinct and, for the first time in my life I was eating cantaloupe and it was during a race. Now I eat it ever since. Throughout my life I’ve learned to “listen to my body” and go by instinct a lot. (This is has limits.)

    I’ve been eating FAR less cheap carbs mostly because I seem to be able to feel the insulin spike they create. Also I added more fruits, vegetables and more nuts. Thanks to Duncan, and yes, I have been feeling good. (But I haven’t put it all to an extreme test yet. I also STRONGLY believe in VARIETY! Although I don’t have any scientific proof, I instinctively believe a big variety of foods is important. I think there is a place on the table for the way Marshall Ulrich ate in his 60 mile a day run across America too. Things vary depending on what you’re doing and who you are. The target is a moving and tricky one.

    Sorry I don’t have a lot of answers, but I believe it’s the endocrine systems limits that I was running into and the question I have is how to eat to support it? Maybe all I can hope to do is stir up the minds out there, and ask more questions. I have a world of respect and admiration for the ultra community and Duncan Callahan and Dr. Scott Drum specifically. Can you keep me from crashing so I can do more insane workouts and make the neighbors and my wife think I’m nuts?

    September 28, 2011
    • Hey Pat,

      Good thoughts. Indeed.. it is all about hormonal regulation. I believe that it starts with insulin. If we can moderate chronically high levels of insulin (by reducing carbohydrate consumption)… then I think a lot of other hormones, etc fall into place: leptin, cortisol, epinephrine, etc. So. I have no conclusive answers either, but I am starting to believe in this lower carbohydrate way of living. Again.. not sure if it will we optimal for 100 miles per week of training, but.. there you go. Definitely consuming less refined products is the way to go.

      Looking at this as a complete change in lifestyle (cliche’ statement I know!) instead of a diet or fad. Kind of exciting! All the best p-dawg. See you this weekend.

      September 29, 2011
  5. said:

    Good discussion, Duncan…I look forward to your experiment and how it affects your training and racing.
    As for me, I am always seeking the best diet to aid in recovery and fueling for training. I a m now about to turn 60, but there was a time 30 years ago when I was running over 100 MPW, racing marathons around 2:45 and ate nothing but crap. Now I’m older, eat a mostly vegetarian diet and struggle with recovery at only 50 mpw. Several years ago we gave up milk, which pretty much eradicated her asthma, we now use soy or almond on our morning oatmeal. This was a definite positive thing to do. I eat meat when I crave it, which might be twice a month.

    September 29, 2011
    • Hey Steve… Thanks for the input. Indeed.. you bring the most important concept to light… recovery. That is what this really is all about. No way I can recover when I am eating like crap, craving sugar all the time, and feeling like crap. I, too gave up milk a few years ago. I still eat some whole milk plain yogurt just about every day. I have been really digging eating more meat lately. Feeling way more satiated. Keep at it. DC

      September 29, 2011
    • Not sure if my reply went through or not. Thanks for the input Steve. You bring a good point to light… that of recovery. Diet should be about assisting in recovery just as much as it is fueling the actual running. Diets that promote lower systemic inflammation are hugely important. Trying to get better. Thanks for the input. All the best. DC

      September 29, 2011
  6. said:

    Good discussion, Duncan…I look forward to your experiment and how it affects your training and racing.
    As for me, I am always seeking the best diet to aid in recovery and fueling for training. I a m now about to turn 60, but there was a time 30 years ago when I was running over 100 MPW, racing marathons around 2:45 and ate nothing but crap. Now I’m older, eat a mostly vegetarian diet and struggle with recovery at only 50 mpw. Several years ago we gave up milk, which pretty much eradicated her asthma, we now use soy or almond on our morning oatmeal. This was a definite positive thing to do. I eat meat when I crave it, which might be twice a month.

    September 29, 2011
    • Hey Steve… Thanks for the input. Indeed.. you bring the most important concept to light… recovery. That is what this really is all about. No way I can recover when I am eating like crap, craving sugar all the time, and feeling like crap. I, too gave up milk a few years ago. I still eat some whole milk plain yogurt just about every day. I have been really digging eating more meat lately. Feeling way more satiated. Keep at it. DC

      September 29, 2011
    • Not sure if my reply went through or not. Thanks for the input Steve. You bring a good point to light… that of recovery. Diet should be about assisting in recovery just as much as it is fueling the actual running. Diets that promote lower systemic inflammation are hugely important. Trying to get better. Thanks for the input. All the best. DC

      September 29, 2011
  7. said:

    Thanks DC. Love this post as it is particularly timely for me. I’m typically of the “eat whatever the hell I want, and a lot of it” camp. Since I work at a hotel that provides an all you can eat meal twice a day, I tend to go WAY overboard and eat tons of garbage. During training my body seems to respond pretty well to this approach but recently I’ve been thinking of ways to take my running to the next level. Nutrition always comes to mind as something I can experiment with. The problem is that, when I train hard, I get SO friggin hungry and I crave the least healthy things I can find. However, I think if I start eating a little better and put more focus on whole foods, my body will be more satiated and, as a result, will recover better and respond better to training blocks. Very tricky to stay disciplined when you have piles of greasy pizza in front of you though.

    September 29, 2011
    • Hey DB. I really like pizza too. My biggest issue though is during the winter when I am coaching and all of the parents of the kids have sent along 42 cookies each. So, the team ends up with roughly 563 cookies for the weekend. I feel obligated to eat them… you know… politics! During our big national races when all of us coaches get together, there is a ton of donuts, etc… that’s tough too. Seriously though… my biggest competitive disadvantage is body weight, body comp, and digestive issues. I have been lucky in the past obviously, but basically I am sick of getting my butt kicked because of diet. So, making some changes that I have tinkered with in the past, but not whole-heartedly gone to. Anyway… I think you should eat worse than you currently do… gotta give guys like me a fighting chance. Looks like you had a good down period and some fun up high around the Maroon Bells. Keep at it.

      September 29, 2011
  8. said:

    Thanks DC. Love this post as it is particularly timely for me. I’m typically of the “eat whatever the hell I want, and a lot of it” camp. Since I work at a hotel that provides an all you can eat meal twice a day, I tend to go WAY overboard and eat tons of garbage. During training my body seems to respond pretty well to this approach but recently I’ve been thinking of ways to take my running to the next level. Nutrition always comes to mind as something I can experiment with. The problem is that, when I train hard, I get SO friggin hungry and I crave the least healthy things I can find. However, I think if I start eating a little better and put more focus on whole foods, my body will be more satiated and, as a result, will recover better and respond better to training blocks. Very tricky to stay disciplined when you have piles of greasy pizza in front of you though.

    September 29, 2011
  9. said:

    Great topic. I’ve been playing with this for a while. Some words of caution. Every endurance athlete I know who has “gone Paleo” feels generally tired in the first couple of weeks IF they continue with their high volume training. This is likely because eating Paleo means you exclude mountains of simple carbohydrates (which is a good thing when they are nutrient-less processed grain foods). This seems to be partially your body adjusting to burn more fat as fuel, and partially a mistake that most make in what they consume (or more likely what they aren’t consuming – starchy carbs). Paleo is macro-nutrient agnostic. It doesn’t have to be low carb… and for ultrarunners it shouldn’t be. I know first hand through clients and myself that it can work low carb for a while, but it’s not optimal in the long term.

    There is NO one size fits all, but Paleo is a great framework, template and starting point. As ultrarunners we are doing exercise volume that was simply not done by our ancestors (they were very active, but did more sprinting and walking slow – they didn’t run 100 mile weeks). So as Devon has, we must adjust our nutrition accordingly. In it’s simplest form Paleo might end up being low carb. But context matters – so if you are an endurance athlete you have to simply eat more carbs. As Devon mentioned; right before, during and right after training. So timing and context matter. Who are you and what are your goals? If you are someone who does low level activity twice a week then strict paleo will work fine.

    My point is that we are going to eat gels because they work. We are going to consume a glycogen repletion recovery drink because it’s most affective. These items don’t grown on trees and are decidedly NOT Paleo. But our goal is to look, feel and PERFORM better…. it’s NOT to do a historic reenactment. It’s also not a religion (I’m looking at you Vegans).

    ** To John Clement’s comment. Hunter gatherers didn’t eat naturally occurring grains because they are indigestible without processing… they simply wouldn’t have bothered. Grains are a neolithic food. We didn’t start cultivating them until 10,000 years ago give or take, which is a small blip in our 2.5 million year evolution. Grains aren’t the devil, but the simple fact is that meat, veggies, fruit and nuts are have a far superior nutrient density.

    September 29, 2011
    • Right on Matt. Thanks so much for the advice. I really do like your ‘statement’ on your site about your stance on nutrition. That does seem to summarize my thoughts/feelings and the Paleo movement as a whole. As for low carb… indeed, right now, only running 4 miles or so a day.. I can get away with it. Also, I am trying to train my body to be better at fat metabolism/ketone etc. Feels way better. Along those lines, I definitely had some fat/weight to lose and have done so (for the most part) over the past 5 weeks. My intention is to use this autumn to reshape my body and metabolism and then add in more carbs as the training ramps up. (can you say turnips and sweet potatoes!?) I have been enjoying Mark Sisson’s readings and Robb Wolf’s podcasts. Getting some good beta from multiple sources. Peter Defty from Vespa is assisting greatly in my ‘transformation’ too. Aside from these sources, Friel’s book is next on my list for reading. Any other resources you would recommend? Thanks again Matt.

      September 29, 2011
  10. said:

    Great topic. I’ve been playing with this for a while. Some words of caution. Every endurance athlete I know who has “gone Paleo” feels generally tired in the first couple of weeks IF they continue with their high volume training. This is likely because eating Paleo means you exclude mountains of simple carbohydrates (which is a good thing when they are nutrient-less processed grain foods). This seems to be partially your body adjusting to burn more fat as fuel, and partially a mistake that most make in what they consume (or more likely what they aren’t consuming – starchy carbs). Paleo is macro-nutrient agnostic. It doesn’t have to be low carb… and for ultrarunners it shouldn’t be. I know first hand through clients and myself that it can work low carb for a while, but it’s not optimal in the long term.

    There is NO one size fits all, but Paleo is a great framework, template and starting point. As ultrarunners we are doing exercise volume that was simply not done by our ancestors (they were very active, but did more sprinting and walking slow – they didn’t run 100 mile weeks). So as Devon has, we must adjust our nutrition accordingly. In it’s simplest form Paleo might end up being low carb. But context matters – so if you are an endurance athlete you have to simply eat more carbs. As Devon mentioned; right before, during and right after training. So timing and context matter. Who are you and what are your goals? If you are someone who does low level activity twice a week then strict paleo will work fine.

    My point is that we are going to eat gels because they work. We are going to consume a glycogen repletion recovery drink because it’s most affective. These items don’t grown on trees and are decidedly NOT Paleo. But our goal is to look, feel and PERFORM better…. it’s NOT to do a historic reenactment. It’s also not a religion (I’m looking at you Vegans).

    ** To John Clement’s comment. Hunter gatherers didn’t eat naturally occurring grains because they are indigestible without processing… they simply wouldn’t have bothered. Grains are a neolithic food. We didn’t start cultivating them until 10,000 years ago give or take, which is a small blip in our 2.5 million year evolution. Grains aren’t the devil, but the simple fact is that meat, veggies, fruit and nuts are have a far superior nutrient density.

    September 29, 2011
    • Right on Matt. Thanks so much for the advice. I really do like your ‘statement’ on your site about your stance on nutrition. That does seem to summarize my thoughts/feelings and the Paleo movement as a whole. As for low carb… indeed, right now, only running 4 miles or so a day.. I can get away with it. Also, I am trying to train my body to be better at fat metabolism/ketone etc. Feels way better. Along those lines, I definitely had some fat/weight to lose and have done so (for the most part) over the past 5 weeks. My intention is to use this autumn to reshape my body and metabolism and then add in more carbs as the training ramps up. (can you say turnips and sweet potatoes!?) I have been enjoying Mark Sisson’s readings and Robb Wolf’s podcasts. Getting some good beta from multiple sources. Peter Defty from Vespa is assisting greatly in my ‘transformation’ too. Aside from these sources, Friel’s book is next on my list for reading. Any other resources you would recommend? Thanks again Matt.

      September 29, 2011
  11. said:

    Great topic. I’ve been playing with this for a while. Some words of caution. Every endurance athlete I know who has “gone Paleo” feels generally tired in the first couple of weeks IF they continue with their high volume training. This is likely because eating Paleo means you exclude mountains of simple carbohydrates (which is a good thing when they are nutrient-less processed grain foods). This seems to be partially your body adjusting to burn more fat as fuel, and partially a mistake that most make in what they consume (or more likely what they aren’t consuming – starchy carbs). Paleo is macro-nutrient agnostic. It doesn’t have to be low carb… and for ultrarunners it shouldn’t be. I know first hand through clients and myself that it can work low carb for a while, but it’s not optimal in the long term.

    There is NO one size fits all, but Paleo is a great framework, template and starting point. As ultrarunners we are doing exercise volume that was simply not done by our ancestors (they were very active, but did more sprinting and walking slow – they didn’t run 100 mile weeks). So as Devon has, we must adjust our nutrition accordingly. In it’s simplest form Paleo might end up being low carb. But context matters – so if you are an endurance athlete you have to simply eat more carbs. As Devon mentioned; right before, during and right after training. So timing and context matter. Who are you and what are your goals? If you are someone who does low level activity twice a week then strict paleo will work fine.

    My point is that we are going to eat gels because they work. We are going to consume a glycogen repletion recovery drink because it’s most affective. These items don’t grown on trees and are decidedly NOT Paleo. But our goal is to look, feel and PERFORM better…. it’s NOT to do a historic reenactment. It’s also not a religion (I’m looking at you Vegans).

    ** To John Clement’s comment. Hunter gatherers didn’t eat naturally occurring grains because they are indigestible without processing… they simply wouldn’t have bothered. Grains are a neolithic food. We didn’t start cultivating them until 10,000 years ago give or take, which is a small blip in our 2.5 million year evolution. Grains aren’t the devil, but the simple fact is that meat, veggies, fruit and nuts are have a far superior nutrient density.

    September 29, 2011
    • Right on Matt. Thanks so much for the advice. I really do like your ‘statement’ on your site about your stance on nutrition. That does seem to summarize my thoughts/feelings and the Paleo movement as a whole. As for low carb… indeed, right now, only running 4 miles or so a day.. I can get away with it. Also, I am trying to train my body to be better at fat metabolism/ketone etc. Feels way better. Along those lines, I definitely had some fat/weight to lose and have done so (for the most part) over the past 5 weeks. My intention is to use this autumn to reshape my body and metabolism and then add in more carbs as the training ramps up. (can you say turnips and sweet potatoes!?) I have been enjoying Mark Sisson’s readings and Robb Wolf’s podcasts. Getting some good beta from multiple sources. Peter Defty from Vespa is assisting greatly in my ‘transformation’ too. Aside from these sources, Friel’s book is next on my list for reading. Any other resources you would recommend? Thanks again Matt.

      September 29, 2011
  12. very good thought here. I know I struggle with what is “right.” I tried moving to strict Paleo diet but still using gels, chews… ect for about 3 weeks and my training suffered. I just could not take it. Tired all the time, dizzy at times (low blood sugar compared to my then current diet I assume.) That said, I probably was not ingesting enough calories. Given that I was back in a training cycle with higher volume I decided to go back to my “normal” diet of eat anything. Energy is back up and i’m running well but I feel less lean or maybe even slightly bloated vs the paleo route.

    At this time my goal is to up the consumption of fruits, veggies, lean meats, and monitor the junk grains, sugars, and dairy until after Javelina. Then work the Paleo diet back in. Ultimately I can see myself in a 75% or so Paleo consumption model. I travel a lot for work and unfortunately a strict diet is very hard to maintain when living out of rental cars and hotels.

    looking forward to following along with this.

    October 11, 2011
    • Indeed Travis. I have not really been training, and as such, I can get away with 100 grams or 150 grams or less of carbohydrate per day. This past weekend, I put in a couple 4 hour training days at a ski training camp. I was hungry all the time, craving sugar, baked goods, and coffee. So… I know I will need to up my intake more as my training increases. Just not sure how high I can take it. Also, I really want to give a grain free lifestyle a shot even when I am training big. Should be interesting.

      Good luck at javelina. I hear you on the traveling thing too. I travel a lot with kids (the ski team) and the amount of gold fish and cookies around is super tempting!

      Best. DC

      October 11, 2011
  13. very good thought here. I know I struggle with what is “right.” I tried moving to strict Paleo diet but still using gels, chews… ect for about 3 weeks and my training suffered. I just could not take it. Tired all the time, dizzy at times (low blood sugar compared to my then current diet I assume.) That said, I probably was not ingesting enough calories. Given that I was back in a training cycle with higher volume I decided to go back to my “normal” diet of eat anything. Energy is back up and i’m running well but I feel less lean or maybe even slightly bloated vs the paleo route.

    At this time my goal is to up the consumption of fruits, veggies, lean meats, and monitor the junk grains, sugars, and dairy until after Javelina. Then work the Paleo diet back in. Ultimately I can see myself in a 75% or so Paleo consumption model. I travel a lot for work and unfortunately a strict diet is very hard to maintain when living out of rental cars and hotels.

    looking forward to following along with this.

    October 11, 2011
    • Indeed Travis. I have not really been training, and as such, I can get away with 100 grams or 150 grams or less of carbohydrate per day. This past weekend, I put in a couple 4 hour training days at a ski training camp. I was hungry all the time, craving sugar, baked goods, and coffee. So… I know I will need to up my intake more as my training increases. Just not sure how high I can take it. Also, I really want to give a grain free lifestyle a shot even when I am training big. Should be interesting.

      Good luck at javelina. I hear you on the traveling thing too. I travel a lot with kids (the ski team) and the amount of gold fish and cookies around is super tempting!

      Best. DC

      October 11, 2011
  14. very good thought here. I know I struggle with what is “right.” I tried moving to strict Paleo diet but still using gels, chews… ect for about 3 weeks and my training suffered. I just could not take it. Tired all the time, dizzy at times (low blood sugar compared to my then current diet I assume.) That said, I probably was not ingesting enough calories. Given that I was back in a training cycle with higher volume I decided to go back to my “normal” diet of eat anything. Energy is back up and i’m running well but I feel less lean or maybe even slightly bloated vs the paleo route.

    At this time my goal is to up the consumption of fruits, veggies, lean meats, and monitor the junk grains, sugars, and dairy until after Javelina. Then work the Paleo diet back in. Ultimately I can see myself in a 75% or so Paleo consumption model. I travel a lot for work and unfortunately a strict diet is very hard to maintain when living out of rental cars and hotels.

    looking forward to following along with this.

    October 11, 2011
    • Indeed Travis. I have not really been training, and as such, I can get away with 100 grams or 150 grams or less of carbohydrate per day. This past weekend, I put in a couple 4 hour training days at a ski training camp. I was hungry all the time, craving sugar, baked goods, and coffee. So… I know I will need to up my intake more as my training increases. Just not sure how high I can take it. Also, I really want to give a grain free lifestyle a shot even when I am training big. Should be interesting.

      Good luck at javelina. I hear you on the traveling thing too. I travel a lot with kids (the ski team) and the amount of gold fish and cookies around is super tempting!

      Best. DC

      October 11, 2011
  15. Jimmy Turner said:

    I’ve recently made some big dietary changes, focusing on a whole foods / plant based diet based on the “China Study” by T. Colin Powell. Just wondering your thoughts regarding animal protein (Casein) vs. plant sourced proteins when specifically training for and recovering from ultra distance events. If you haven’t read this book, check it out. I enjoy your blog topic and best of luck to you Duncan in the upcoming year. See you at the “Spring Desert Ultra” in April.

    Jimmy Turner – Grand Junction

    December 26, 2011
    • Hello Jimmy. Thanks for the comments. I have heard about the China Study, although I have not read it. I will be sure to put it on the list. It is almost time to start writing on the website again! I will be updating some more nutritional information and anecdotes. Indeed… see you at the Spring Desert Ultra. DC

      December 27, 2011
  16. Jimmy Turner said:

    I’ve recently made some big dietary changes, focusing on a whole foods / plant based diet based on the “China Study” by T. Colin Powell. Just wondering your thoughts regarding animal protein (Casein) vs. plant sourced proteins when specifically training for and recovering from ultra distance events. If you haven’t read this book, check it out. I enjoy your blog topic and best of luck to you Duncan in the upcoming year. See you at the “Spring Desert Ultra” in April.

    Jimmy Turner – Grand Junction

    December 26, 2011
  17. Jimmy Turner said:

    I’ve recently made some big dietary changes, focusing on a whole foods / plant based diet based on the “China Study” by T. Colin Powell. Just wondering your thoughts regarding animal protein (Casein) vs. plant sourced proteins when specifically training for and recovering from ultra distance events. If you haven’t read this book, check it out. I enjoy your blog topic and best of luck to you Duncan in the upcoming year. See you at the “Spring Desert Ultra” in April.

    Jimmy Turner – Grand Junction

    December 26, 2011
    • Hello Jimmy. Thanks for the comments. I have heard about the China Study, although I have not read it. I will be sure to put it on the list. It is almost time to start writing on the website again! I will be updating some more nutritional information and anecdotes. Indeed… see you at the Spring Desert Ultra. DC

      December 27, 2011
  18. Jimmy Turner said:

    Sorry, the author of “The China Study” is T. Colin Campbell, not Powell. My bad!

    December 26, 2011
    • Colin Powell… that would be good.

      December 27, 2011
  19. Jimmy Turner said:

    Sorry, the author of “The China Study” is T. Colin Campbell, not Powell. My bad!

    December 26, 2011
    • Colin Powell… that would be good.

      December 27, 2011
  20. Jimmy Turner said:

    Sorry, the author of “The China Study” is T. Colin Campbell, not Powell. My bad!

    December 26, 2011
    • Colin Powell… that would be good.

      December 27, 2011

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