13 Comments

  1. said:

    I strongly stand on what Ryan Hall said in his article that you linked to recently as he struggles with this question, while bumping up against performance. Obviously we should train only to what extent it makes us win!

    Having said that, I think I understand what get’s us in trouble. It’s the desire to perform better. The big problem is the line is not always clear. So where should we stop? Unfortunately we don’t usually see the line until after we pass it. Oops!

    Also there is something extremely and DEEPLY satisfying about going farther and farther!

    I was once kicked out of a boxing gym for working out for 6 hours without taking a break.

    Ate the 23 oz porter house steak at the Claim Jumper, the 3 pound bake potato, salad, desert and finished all the leftovers from my sisters family, her husband and my parents plates.

    I did hill sprint repeats on a steep rocky trail, until I worked through several pain and exhaustion barriers and a guy less than half my age asked me “how long are you going to do that?” At some point I thought, my legs are beginning to be rubber and I’m gonna go down on my face!

    Some will run until they sweat and stop. Others will run until everyone watching them is getting sick and they begin to have hallucinations and then they want to run just to see what the next hallucination is. /

    My 18 year old role models were the Barbarian Twins (power-lifters / bodybuilders) They had a saying: “There is no such thing as over-training; there is only under-sleeping and under-eating.”

    I finally achieved (a couple years ago) over training disease. It wasn’t fun at all. It shut me down and forced me to bed because my endocrine system wouldn’t support that level of work.

    My answer? Eat more and sleep more but if you see that line approaching…. Don’t cross it.
    : )

    September 13, 2011
    • I like it Pat. Steaks are good. Eat steaks! So many questions.

      September 13, 2011
  2. said:

    I strongly stand on what Ryan Hall said in his article that you linked to recently as he struggles with this question, while bumping up against performance. Obviously we should train only to what extent it makes us win!

    Having said that, I think I understand what get’s us in trouble. It’s the desire to perform better. The big problem is the line is not always clear. So where should we stop? Unfortunately we don’t usually see the line until after we pass it. Oops!

    Also there is something extremely and DEEPLY satisfying about going farther and farther!

    I was once kicked out of a boxing gym for working out for 6 hours without taking a break.

    Ate the 23 oz porter house steak at the Claim Jumper, the 3 pound bake potato, salad, desert and finished all the leftovers from my sisters family, her husband and my parents plates.

    I did hill sprint repeats on a steep rocky trail, until I worked through several pain and exhaustion barriers and a guy less than half my age asked me “how long are you going to do that?” At some point I thought, my legs are beginning to be rubber and I’m gonna go down on my face!

    Some will run until they sweat and stop. Others will run until everyone watching them is getting sick and they begin to have hallucinations and then they want to run just to see what the next hallucination is. /

    My 18 year old role models were the Barbarian Twins (power-lifters / bodybuilders) They had a saying: “There is no such thing as over-training; there is only under-sleeping and under-eating.”

    I finally achieved (a couple years ago) over training disease. It wasn’t fun at all. It shut me down and forced me to bed because my endocrine system wouldn’t support that level of work.

    My answer? Eat more and sleep more but if you see that line approaching…. Don’t cross it.
    : )

    September 13, 2011
  3. Steve Pero said:

    Excellent discussion and very timely for me to read. I’ve been training and racing now for over 36 years. Back in my 30’s I ran 100+ mile weeks, hills, speed, races almost every weekend….now at almost 60 year’s old, I’m beginning to realize that all the training I’m doing is breaking me down more than building me up. I’m tired all the time, legs are tight and stiff when I get out of my chair at work, age is catching up with me and I don’t like it….but I’m going to make some changes to see if I can work it out. I have always felt that I should run every day, now I force a day off completely on Monday after the back to back long runs on the weekend. As I further my experiment, maybe I’ll need to add another easy day of no running, possibly cross training, ala the Hanson or FIRST training dictates. My mind still thinks it’s 30 with the desire to race at a high level, but the body is saying no…
    Back in the day, George Sheehan, after turning 50 and experiencing the same issues, went to an every other day schedule and that year ran a sub 5 minute mile and sub 3 hour marathon, maybe there is something to this thing they call rest…

    September 14, 2011
    • Hey Steve. Great to hear the perspective of someone who has been doing this for a while. Thanks for sharing. Doing some reading on cortisol levels, etc too. Interesting stuff. Thanks again! Keep after it.

      September 14, 2011
  4. Carol said:

    As your mother I recall those early days. I marvel even now at your single minded determination about most things. As you would head out the door for your usual “quick run” and return later after a 25-30 mile jaunt, I smiled proudly, shook my head and thought how cool it was to have such a determined son. But even then I worried about your safety and your health. I remember saying “you live to train” . I wished you enjoyed the wins as much as the process. Remember to run for the JOY!!!!!!! We are proud for all you do. Love!!!!

    September 14, 2011
    • Hey Mom! Thanks for the comment. Yeah.. you had to put up with a lot of crap. Thanks for your support for everything though. Thanks! Love son.

      September 15, 2011
  5. Carol said:

    As your mother I recall those early days. I marvel even now at your single minded determination about most things. As you would head out the door for your usual “quick run” and return later after a 25-30 mile jaunt, I smiled proudly, shook my head and thought how cool it was to have such a determined son. But even then I worried about your safety and your health. I remember saying “you live to train” . I wished you enjoyed the wins as much as the process. Remember to run for the JOY!!!!!!! We are proud for all you do. Love!!!!

    September 14, 2011
    • Hey Mom! Thanks for the comment. Yeah.. you had to put up with a lot of crap. Thanks for your support for everything though. Thanks! Love son.

      September 15, 2011
  6. Hey Andy… great points. Thanks for the input. Change is good… gotta remember that from time to time! Thanks and all the best to you

    September 15, 2011
  7. Good thoughts and comments. Thanks for sharing Alex. Keep on truckin

    September 19, 2011
  8. Good thoughts and comments. Thanks for sharing Alex. Keep on truckin

    September 19, 2011

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